A true gentleman will always wear a vest and a hat. What a classic ME wardrobe!  A true gentleman will always wear a vest and a hat. What a classic ME wardrobe! 

A true gentleman will always wear a vest and a hat. What a classic ME wardrobe! 

Michael is in LA now with Carrie.via Carrie’s instagram (X) Michael is in LA now with Carrie.via Carrie’s instagram (X)

Michael is in LA now with Carrie.via Carrie’s instagram (X)

Amazing Michael at wrap party yesterday. Amazing Michael at wrap party yesterday.

Amazing Michael at wrap party yesterday.

rmrhodes:

This week’s episode of Person of Interest basically stepped all over my professional subject matter expertise. Not once, but three times.

First, there was a mention of hard copies of security clearance paperwork. I know - from the job where I used to help people get security clearances - that…

Look how amazing michael looks! Look how amazing michael looks!

Look how amazing michael looks!

mamahub:

Michael Emerson’s interview with Worldscreen, published March 18, 2014. 
(Unfortunately, only the first part of the interview is printed, and I did not wish to pay the $99 subscription fee to see the rest.)
Michael Emerson Discusses Person of Interest
By Anna Carugati
Published: March 18, 2014

NEW YORK: Michael Emerson, who developed a loyal following with his performance as Benjamin Linus on the critically acclaimed series Lost, discusses now playing a brilliant somewhat mysterious and eccentric billionaire on Person of Interest as Mr. Finch.
WS: What first appealed to you about Person of Interest and how did you hear about it?EMERSON: It was among a pile of scripts that were being batted around at Bad Robot [J.J. Abrams’ company that produced Lost and is also behind Person of Interest] in the fall of 2010. I was working on a different project that I hoped was going to take off, but it didn’t work out. I still had a relationship with Bad Robot and I said, Surely you’ve got something else around here that’s cool. They showed me this and said, This might interest you, it’s kind of a noir setting, New York City-based, crime fighting, vigilante; it could be fun. I read it and I really liked it. I liked the mood of it and the atmosphere and the setting and it seemed like a good part, so I just went with it. Then you make a pilot and you think that’s that, it may or may not get picked up. And it certainly may or may not ever have success. This one has done well.
WS: It certainly has. Was it a consideration for you, in looking at this project, that your next role after Ben Linus be a different kind of character?EMERSON: Well, I was thinking about that and it was nice I thought that this character was an all together good guy, even though he was brainy and articulate, I thought that was a nice change.
WS: There are a lot of shows that feature flawed characters, or characters whose moral compass is not pointing true north. Is it more difficult to portray somebody who is basically a decent person or can that be just as satisfying a character to play?EMERSON: It’s a little harder to make good guys interesting, especially as you say, the general feeling right now is the chase for anti heroes or worse. Villainy or darkness have a few more layers or might be a little more complex. Whether you are playing a good guy or a bad guy, it’s fun if the character is complicated.
WS: Finch has a limp and some previous injuries. Did you add that in and is that a way of bringing complexity to the character?EMERSON: There was mention in the pilot script about him having been injured and it was up to me to figure out the specifics of that. That was always part of it. It justified him needing a helper; it was why he could not do it alone. It sets everything up. But we explained where those injuries came from at the end of season two.
WS: A prototype of the Machine really did exist, right?EMERSON: Yes, several different ones in reality, programs that were funded by the American government at one time or another.
This interview continues here.


Also try here for full script. mamahub:

Michael Emerson’s interview with Worldscreen, published March 18, 2014. 
(Unfortunately, only the first part of the interview is printed, and I did not wish to pay the $99 subscription fee to see the rest.)
Michael Emerson Discusses Person of Interest
By Anna Carugati
Published: March 18, 2014

NEW YORK: Michael Emerson, who developed a loyal following with his performance as Benjamin Linus on the critically acclaimed series Lost, discusses now playing a brilliant somewhat mysterious and eccentric billionaire on Person of Interest as Mr. Finch.
WS: What first appealed to you about Person of Interest and how did you hear about it?EMERSON: It was among a pile of scripts that were being batted around at Bad Robot [J.J. Abrams’ company that produced Lost and is also behind Person of Interest] in the fall of 2010. I was working on a different project that I hoped was going to take off, but it didn’t work out. I still had a relationship with Bad Robot and I said, Surely you’ve got something else around here that’s cool. They showed me this and said, This might interest you, it’s kind of a noir setting, New York City-based, crime fighting, vigilante; it could be fun. I read it and I really liked it. I liked the mood of it and the atmosphere and the setting and it seemed like a good part, so I just went with it. Then you make a pilot and you think that’s that, it may or may not get picked up. And it certainly may or may not ever have success. This one has done well.
WS: It certainly has. Was it a consideration for you, in looking at this project, that your next role after Ben Linus be a different kind of character?EMERSON: Well, I was thinking about that and it was nice I thought that this character was an all together good guy, even though he was brainy and articulate, I thought that was a nice change.
WS: There are a lot of shows that feature flawed characters, or characters whose moral compass is not pointing true north. Is it more difficult to portray somebody who is basically a decent person or can that be just as satisfying a character to play?EMERSON: It’s a little harder to make good guys interesting, especially as you say, the general feeling right now is the chase for anti heroes or worse. Villainy or darkness have a few more layers or might be a little more complex. Whether you are playing a good guy or a bad guy, it’s fun if the character is complicated.
WS: Finch has a limp and some previous injuries. Did you add that in and is that a way of bringing complexity to the character?EMERSON: There was mention in the pilot script about him having been injured and it was up to me to figure out the specifics of that. That was always part of it. It justified him needing a helper; it was why he could not do it alone. It sets everything up. But we explained where those injuries came from at the end of season two.
WS: A prototype of the Machine really did exist, right?EMERSON: Yes, several different ones in reality, programs that were funded by the American government at one time or another.
This interview continues here.


Also try here for full script.

mamahub:

Michael Emerson’s interview with Worldscreen, published March 18, 2014. 

(Unfortunately, only the first part of the interview is printed, and I did not wish to pay the $99 subscription fee to see the rest.)

Michael Emerson Discusses Person of Interest
By Anna Carugati
Published: March 18, 2014
NEW YORK: Michael Emerson, who developed a loyal following with his performance as Benjamin Linus on the critically acclaimed series Lost, discusses now playing a brilliant somewhat mysterious and eccentric billionaire on Person of Interest as Mr. Finch.

WS: What first appealed to you about Person of Interest and how did you hear about it?
EMERSON: It was among a pile of scripts that were being batted around at Bad Robot [J.J. Abrams’ company that produced Lost and is also behind Person of Interest] in the fall of 2010. I was working on a different project that I hoped was going to take off, but it didn’t work out. I still had a relationship with Bad Robot and I said, Surely you’ve got something else around here that’s cool. They showed me this and said, This might interest you, it’s kind of a noir setting, New York City-based, crime fighting, vigilante; it could be fun. I read it and I really liked it. I liked the mood of it and the atmosphere and the setting and it seemed like a good part, so I just went with it. Then you make a pilot and you think that’s that, it may or may not get picked up. And it certainly may or may not ever have success. This one has done well.

WS: It certainly has. Was it a consideration for you, in looking at this project, that your next role after Ben Linus be a different kind of character?
EMERSON: Well, I was thinking about that and it was nice I thought that this character was an all together good guy, even though he was brainy and articulate, I thought that was a nice change.

WS: There are a lot of shows that feature flawed characters, or characters whose moral compass is not pointing true north. Is it more difficult to portray somebody who is basically a decent person or can that be just as satisfying a character to play?
EMERSON: It’s a little harder to make good guys interesting, especially as you say, the general feeling right now is the chase for anti heroes or worse. Villainy or darkness have a few more layers or might be a little more complex. Whether you are playing a good guy or a bad guy, it’s fun if the character is complicated.

WS: Finch has a limp and some previous injuries. Did you add that in and is that a way of bringing complexity to the character?
EMERSON: There was mention in the pilot script about him having been injured and it was up to me to figure out the specifics of that. That was always part of it. It justified him needing a helper; it was why he could not do it alone. It sets everything up. But we explained where those injuries came from at the end of season two.

WS: A prototype of the Machine really did exist, right?
EMERSON: Yes, several different ones in reality, programs that were funded by the American government at one time or another.

This interview continues here.

Also try here for full script.

warnerbrostv:

Join the Person of Interest Writers for a live chat on Twitter during tonight’s new episode, starting 10pm EST/7 pm PST.

Tweet along using ‪#‎PersonofInterest‬ and follow the POI Writers for an inside look at the series: https://twitter.com/POIWritersRoom

Pictures of Michael on Sunday’s Big Boozy Benefit event in NYC. via Three Day Hangover Facebook https://www.facebook.com/threedayhangover Pictures of Michael on Sunday’s Big Boozy Benefit event in NYC. via Three Day Hangover Facebook https://www.facebook.com/threedayhangover Pictures of Michael on Sunday’s Big Boozy Benefit event in NYC. via Three Day Hangover Facebook https://www.facebook.com/threedayhangover Pictures of Michael on Sunday’s Big Boozy Benefit event in NYC. via Three Day Hangover Facebook https://www.facebook.com/threedayhangover Pictures of Michael on Sunday’s Big Boozy Benefit event in NYC. via Three Day Hangover Facebook https://www.facebook.com/threedayhangover Pictures of Michael on Sunday’s Big Boozy Benefit event in NYC. via Three Day Hangover Facebook https://www.facebook.com/threedayhangover

Pictures of Michael on Sunday’s Big Boozy Benefit event in NYC. via Three Day Hangover Facebook https://www.facebook.com/threedayhangover

The one and only MICHAEL EMERSON last Saturday. He performed the famous TO BE OR NOT TO BE of HAMLET. Look how amazing he was when he was playing some classic theatre.

"

But stories change. Characters change. Shows change. And plans have to change to accommodate that.

This plan didn’t. So instead of a bumpy final few years being redeemed by a finale that at least resulted in our hero winding up with a woman we all liked, and who seemed a perfect match for him, we have a finale that turns the title and narrative framework of the show into a case of Bays and Thomas following the letter of the law rather than the spirit. They and Future Ted promised us that we’d be getting the story of how Ted met the kids’ mother, but all along she was just meant to be a distraction from the real story — like the kind of misdirection Barney uses in his magic tricks.

And the problem is that at a certain point the misdirection became vastly more entertaining than the illusion it was designed to facilitate, and as a result we just wind up feeling tricked, and annoyed, and wondering why we went along with all of it, when we should have known from the very first episode — from the Aunt Robin joke that got us into this gigantic mess — that this was a show that would not hesitate to make us feel tricked. And once upon a time, when we and “HIMYM” were younger, that was fun, but at a certain point, like the idea of Barney Stinson still having a Playbook in his 40s, it’s just sad.

"
Alan Sepinwall, Series finale review: ‘How I Met Your Mother’ - ‘Last Forever’: How they conned us all
(via imsirius)

You know what, after watching series finale of HIMYM, it occurred to me how many other show runners promised that they had a plan and how them totally destroyed the whole shows. Please, Jonah and Greg, I know you know the ending of POI long ago, make it good.